How Apple Lost

25Mar10

I do not like Apple. I am by no means a computer elite, but I do like a good machine. The prime reason I do not like Apple is because of it’s users. Often times, they’re annoying to me. An Apple sticker on your car?! Seriously? I should put a Windows sticker or an Ubuntu sticker on my car (Speaking of, I saw a guy in an Ubuntu toboggan the other day. Not much cooler than the Apple bumper sticker).

Apple’s iPad – and pads in general – fail because I feel that they’d be incredibly awkward to work with and to use. They come with a stand, or perhaps the stand is extra. So how irritating! An extra part! The netbook doesn’t need a fucking stand! Also, as a reader, the lighting / contrast is way off.

Now, Apple failed with the iPad – AND with all Apple products*** – by not supporting Flash. And again, those Apple users are adamant in overcoming that by saying “Oh, Flash sucks anyway man”, or “Flash is doomed to fail”. WRONG. Flash is easily 80% of the internet. Most EVERY site uses a Flash component. So… Apple is DOOMED TO FAIL because you can not get a full internet experience without Flash!! (as explained in the vid below).

Android has come out with it’s version of a tab which is Demo’d below. Now, I love Android – and really wish Verizon would HTFU with the Droid’s 2.1 Android update on my phone – but I’m still not sold on a pad or tablet device.

***Thanks Brad. Honest mistake.  iPhone OS is the only Apple product that doesn’t support Flash.

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9 Responses to “How Apple Lost”

  1. 1 Bradley

    To be fair, iPhone OS is the only apple product without flash support, which is hardly “All Apple Products”

  2. Thanks, Brad. Noted in post above.

  3. I fully agree that advertising the iPad as having the best internet experience when it can’t even do Flash is disingenuous on Steve Jobs’ part.

    But I don’t understand your criticism of the iPhone’s lack of Flash, for three reasons:

    1. The iPhone isn’t supposed to give you the best internet experience. It’s a phone. The fact that it does internet at all is an accomplishment. No one thinks of phone web browsers as the best web browsers. They’re just convenient web browsers to have when a real computer web browser isn’t readily available.

    2. The iPhone has a YouTube app. So even though you can’t view Flash websites, if you want to watch a YouTube video (which a lot of Flash on the web really is), you can do that on the iPhone.

    3. You say you like Android. Well, so do I. I have an Android phone. Guess what! Most Android phones do not have Flash on them. The Hero has a light version of Flash. But the Dream doesn’t. The Magic doesn’t. The Droid doesn’t. The Nexus One doesn’t. These phones, like the iPhone, are just fine for web browsing. And they also have a YouTube app for watching YouTube videos.

    I don’t see a reason to bash Apple. Let people use what they prefer. I happen to like and dislike various parts of Windows, Mac OS X, and various Linux distros. Right now I prefer to use Ubuntu. But I like Mac and Windows, too. If people want to use Apple products, let them. If you want to avoid Apple products, avoid them. What’s the big deal?

  4. A.Y – thanks for the comment. While you make good arguments I must clarify that I am not talking about the iPhone, but the iPad. I also fully understand that Android phones are not yet supporting flash, as I’m an Android user also.

    But I do want to say… I think if you are using a new generation of phones now out through Apple and Android – you SHOULD expect a full internet experience. Same with a pad. If you spend $500 for an iPad – I should be able to see sites with flash, play Farmville (or the flash game of your choice) etc…

  5. 5 John

    To be extra fair to Apple… not only is Flash on Mac… it was a Mac-first product. I still remember getting the free developer kit from Macromedia when it first came out (the place I worked used a lot of Freehand so I think that’s how we got it).

  6. 6 Adam

    “Flash is easily 80% of the internet”?
    Do you have a citation for that? Its sounds quite inflated. Especially when you consider that the internet is more than just web pages.

  7. Nothing other than what was said in the video. But… I believe that it is a high percentage. Most every site I visit has some sort of Flash component to it.

    • 8 Adam

      I’d still disagree… Just because “80% of websites have some flash content of some kind” doesn’t mean that Flash = 80% of the internet. I wouldn’t even agree if someone said “websites = 80% of the internet”.
      But even if a large percentage of websites do use some Flash, I still don’t find it all that important, most of the time, anyway.
      I’ve been using the flashblock extension for Firefox/Icecat for a few years now and it’s pretty rare that I have to set an exception to do what I want to do because Flash is a necessity, aside from sites such as youtube.
      As for Android not supporting Flash, I’m kinda happy about that. Sure, there are the rare sites that won’t work properly without it, but not supporting Flash will save a good deal of bandwidth and CPU resources that would otherwise have been taken to display a flashing banner for Viagra/Cialis etc instead of loading the page I’m trying to view.
      Sure, Flash is kinda cool but I don’t see it as a deal-breaker.

  8. 9 Matt

    To me this is a tough topic, on one hand I totally agree that releasing the I-Pad without flash support was a HUGE mistake. But as others have said most Android phones don’t support flash either. I even Jailbroke my cousin’s G1 and I still find I can get more supported sights then on the Android phones (using my Iphone). I am jealous of the Google Skymap application for Android phones though (not that it’s the topic but it’s still an app the Iphone can’t touch that I’m aware of). The the bottom line is, WTF can’t the Android phones, iPhones, Itoch, and Ipad simply give you the option of enabling flash. As Adam said flash is a HUGE resource hog but with a newer 3G phone you have more then enough bandwidth and processing power to use it.


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